Tune in or Tune Out? Part Two.

The tune out floats are the ones people chase, that feeling of nothing and nowhere. These are the easiest to find but the hardest to maintain.

Most of us will glimpse this float in our first or second try. If you have floated before you will recognise the ‘tune out’ by a sudden jolt or flicker like you have woken abruptly from sleep at the end. This state is called the ‘theta state;’ a deep meditative state before sleep where the left and right hemisphere of the brain fuse and leave you in an abyss.

This float is by far the hardest thing to explain as the truth of the matter is nothing happens.. But that is the goal. It’s in this nothingness that you find a true rest from the mind and the body. The best way to describe the nothingness is when you jump into a pool for the first time, as your head passes through the water you hear the explosion of bubbles and for a split second when your brain processes that you are underwater there is a silence, a nothing. It is very faint and happens in an instant but that moment there is what the ‘tune out’ feels like.

The beauty of this moment is if mastered, afterwards that rushing feeling of endorphins is amplified by how long you are “tuned out” for.

But you never know how long it is, nor where you've been, nor where you are right now. You become so disassociated from everything that you have no idea how to comprehend it. Imagine something with no time, space or matter. You can’t, nor can you explain where you go or what happens whilst you are gone.

Second versions of the ‘tune out’ can be experienced by hallucinations (whatever that means for you). Colours and visions have been described by longtime floaters but your mind will explore itself in ways no one other than you can describe.  The main point of the exercise is to really kick back into chill mode, you will find after this you seem to wear a bulletproof vest over your mind. It’s completely refreshing and addictive all in one.

Back to my original thoughts: it’s near impossible to decide what happens when you go in for your float, but they key is to not resist in order to make the most of it.  


I want to include some tips I use before and after to again maximise the experience;

  • Avoid the use of your phone for at least 30 minutes to an hour after your float. This helps you graciously migrate back into the world without being bombarded or struck with anything ‘over dramatic’.

  • Have gratitude for yourself for taking the time out and valuing your wellness above all else.

My key floating times:

  • 9.30am start your day right with this float. Generally after exercise or before a busy day. See how productive and energised this makes you.

  • 3.30pm & 5.00pm after work floats solidify a successful day or ease a stressful one. Its also amazing going in when its light and coming out in the dark!

  • 8.00pm for the night owls; It’s an extremely peaceful time to come out of your float and either set yourself up for the best sleep or relax into the evening.

  • Hydrate! Before and after your float make sure you are hydrated (A toilet is a good option beforehand always).

  • Like a good episode of ‘Cops’, STOP RESISTING! Resist and the problems persist.

  • Not all floats are created equal! Floating over a long period of time, I have had the good, the bad and the blissful. All serving a specific purpose regardless of how I perceive it.

If you have any questions about floating, my experiences or have shared a similar experience, please get in touch with me at jeremy@citycave.com.au